The Urethra

Original Author: Oliver Jones
Last Updated: October 31, 2017
Revisions: 14

The urethra is the vessel responsible for transporting urine from the bladder to an external opening in the perineum. It is lined by stratified columnar epithelium, which is protected from the corrosive urine by mucus secreting glands.

The anatomical course of the urethra is different in males and females. In this article, we shall look at the anatomy of the male and female urethra, their anatomical courses, and any clinical relevance.


Male Urethra

Fig 1.0 - Coronal section of the penis, showing the four parts of the urethra.

Fig 1.0 – Coronal section of the penis, showing the four parts of the urethra.

The male urethra is approximately 15-20cm long. In addition to urine, the male urethra provides an exit for semen (a fluid containing spermatozoa and sex gland secretions).

Anatomically, the urethra can be divided into four parts:

  • Pre-prostatic (intramural): Begins at the internal urethral orifice, located at the neck of the bladder. It passes through the wall of the bladder, and ends at the prostate.
  • Prostatic: Passes through the prostate gland. The ejaculatory ducts (containing spermatozoa from the testes, and seminal fluid from the seminal vesicle glands) and the prostatic ducts drain into the urethra here.
  • Membranous: Passes through the pelvic floor, and the deep perineal pouch. It is surrounded by the external urethral sphincter, which provides voluntary control of micturition.
  • Spongy: Passes through the bulb and corpus spongiosum of the penis, ending at the external urethral orifice. In the glans penis, the urethra dilates, forming the navicular fossa. The bulbourethral glands empty into the proximal urethra.
Fig 1.1 - The infrapubic and prepubic angles of the male urethra. The prepubic angle can be removed by raising the penis during catheterisation.

Fig 1.1 – The infrapubic and prepubic angles of the male urethra. The prepubic angle can be removed by raising the penis during catheterisation.

Clinical Relevance: Male Catheterisation

Urinary catheterisation is the process of inserting a tube through the urethra and into the bladder. This intervention is used in situations where urine output needs to be monitored, or when the patient is unable to pass urine.

Catheterisation is more complex in males, as there are two angles to consider – the infrapubic and prepubic angles. The prepubic angle can be removed by holding the penis upwards during urinary catheterisation.

It is also important to note the three constrictions in the male urethra – the internal urethral sphincter, external urethral sphincter, and external urethral orifice.


Female Urethra

Fig 1.2 - Location of the external urethral orifice in the vestibule.

Fig 1.2 – Location of the external urethral orifice in the vestibule.

In women, the urethra is relatively short (approximately 4cm). This predisposes women to urinary tract infections.

The urethra begins at the neck of the bladder, and passes inferiorly through the perineal membrane and muscular pelvic floor. It opens directly onto the perineum, in an area between the labia minora, known as the vestibule. Within the vestibule, the urethral orifice is located anteriorly to the vaginal opening, and 2-3cm posteriorly to the clitoris.

The distal end of the urethra is marked by the presence of two mucous glands that lie either side of the urethra. These glands are homologous to the male prostate.

Clinical Relevance: Urinary Tract Infections

Due to the short length of the urethra, women are more susceptible to infections of the urinary tract. This usually manifests as cystitis, an infection of the bladder.

Common symptoms of cystitis are dysuria (pain upon urination), frequency, urgency, and haematuria (blood in the urine). A mid stream urine sample can be taken, and tested for the presence of nitrites and leukocytes (both of which indicate infection).

Urinary tract infections are treated with a three day course of antibiotics.

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Question 1 / 5
What is the length of the male urethra?

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Question 2 / 5
Which section of the male urethra (seen below in green) passes through the pelvic floor?

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Question 3 / 5
There are a number of difficult regions to consider during male catheterisation, which of these can be removed by holding the penis upright?

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Question 4 / 5
On the image below, which label indicates the location of the external urethral orifice in females?

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Question 5 / 5
In women, what is the area that the urethra opens onto known as?

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